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View Full Version : where should i go after gscript?


Samurai_X2689
11-16-2006, 05:19 AM
i've gotten the hang of gscript pretty well, and was just wondering what programming language should i learn that resembles gscript. my goal in the long run is c++. but i dont know if i should go directly and start with that. or maybe do something a little easier first. any ideas?

ps. i really had no idea where to post it and it has to do with scripting so i figured i'd post it here. correct me if its the wrong thread please.

Joey_P2P
11-16-2006, 07:51 AM
ps. i really had no idea where to post it and it has to do with scripting so i figured i'd post it here. correct me if its the wrong thread please.

try the non graal related ;).

Also, HTML + PHP is easy and fun to grasp.

Twinny
11-16-2006, 08:18 AM
Java / C++ would be the way to go. Although apparently C# is becoming the industry standard.

ryu_no_bishie
11-16-2006, 12:08 PM
like twinny said, java or C++

Gscript was built to resemple java too i think.

coreys
11-16-2006, 04:06 PM
My favorite is C, though I haven't bothered to learn much in it. I learned Java fairly well, but Java is *** as hell. For web design definately learn HTML, JavaScript, PHP, and maybe some XML. Those are easy and don't take long to learn. From there then, you should go to C or C++.

Whats the difference between C# and C and/or C++, anyways?

Skyld
11-16-2006, 05:43 PM
If you intend to learn C++, make sure that you have a basis in C first or you might miss some basic understanding. I can write C, but I have not yet bothered to learn C++.

jake13jake
11-16-2006, 06:34 PM
With the similarities, I would suggest diving into Java first (where there are the strongest similarities). Your goal shouldn't be language-specific if you intend to be a programmer because you're more valuable if you know more languages.

Other programming languages you should look into are C/++/#, Perl, and Lisp. I would even say MIPS if you wanted to learn assembly. It's important to know what your code is being turned into after all. Knowing C++, Java, Perl, Lisp, and MIPS, you'd probably have a stronger grasp of even more programming languages than you can say you know because there are so many languages simply based off of C, Java, Perl, and Lisp. Knowing MIPS would just give you an idea of RISC assembly.

Oh, and for the difference between C++ and C. C++ is pretty much a superset of C (has all the same stuff plus some). In fact, a lot of times you have to convert to char * from string just because there's so much code reuse. Of course I don't see the point of using a string as opposed to a char * for a filename, there's a lot of extra overhead there. However, the prime example would be file IO. To get a string to return a char * it's stringname.c_str(); char * is referred to as a C String because that's how all strings are represented in C (I haven't used C, but the largest difference might possibly be that you don't have classes in C, can't say though).

C# I haven't really looked into, but I've heard it been referred to as Microsoft's response to Sun's Java. Therefore, I think it would have a lot of similarities to C++ and Java, which are -already- very similar.

Admins
11-17-2006, 02:46 AM
I would say going C++ is the best, especially if you want to be platform-independent and fast and use many external libraries, although it is good to look into different directions. Often the language is not the most important, they are often quite the same. What is more important is if the language is doing what you want: in some cases php and javascript or even ruby are wonderful (for websites), sometimes Flash script, sometimes Java, often C/C++. Even Visual Basic or C# can be good solutions although it is limiting you a little bit to Microsoft-stuff.

What is more important is an understanding of concepts - organization of code, reusability, documentation, etc. You also need to learn to find documentation and code examples, ways to do things easier instead of spending too much time on solving some little detail.

Twinny
11-17-2006, 03:45 AM
Documentation....ugh... i've wasted enough of this year and last learning how to document projects :\

Krakken
11-17-2006, 08:53 PM
C++, no doubt about it.

michael7849
11-24-2006, 07:45 AM
Want to Learn c++ than go here http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/

Luigi203
11-24-2006, 07:48 AM
PHP is to GScript2 what monkeys are to humans

xAndrewx
11-24-2006, 09:37 PM
PHP is to GScript2 what monkeys are to humans

Advanced? ;) (joke)

Googi
11-24-2006, 10:57 PM
where should i go after gscript?

GScript2.

Crono
11-24-2006, 11:09 PM
GScript2.

wtf i wanted to say that! exactly the same way too. damn

michael7849
11-25-2006, 04:34 AM
yea i guess gscript 2 lol XD

Chompy
11-25-2006, 03:02 PM
yea i guess gscript 2 lol XD

lol

ApothiX
11-30-2006, 04:12 PM
Oh, and for the difference between C++ and C. C++ is pretty much a superset of C (has all the same stuff plus some). In fact, a lot of times you have to convert to char * from string just because there's so much code reuse.
std::string is not a built-in datatype in C++. It is a part of the STL.

(I haven't used C, but the largest difference might possibly be that you don't have classes in C, can't say though).

That, and templates are what pretty much make up C++.

jake13jake
12-01-2006, 12:06 AM
std::string is not a built-in datatype in C++. It is a part of the STL.


That, and templates are what pretty much make up C++.

I'm not claiming string to be a built-in data-type. It was developed as a result of the addition of object-oriented features. I'm just pointing out that it's a hassle to switch between char * and string because most higher level functionality will use the string class.